Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 278-282

Etiologic and clinical features of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Neurology, King Fahd Hospital of University Alkhobar, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam 34212, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, 7-112L Clinical Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Rizwana Shahid
Department of Neurology, King Fahd Hospital of University Alkhobar, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, 2835 King Faisal Road, Post Code 31952, Dammam 34212
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jnrp.jnrp_305_18

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Objective: Our study aims to evaluate the etiologic and clinical features of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) in Saudi Arabia, and secondarily whether gender plays a role in CVST. Materials and Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from the stroke registry during the period from January 2008 to April 2018, and the patients with the diagnosis of CVST were identified, and data were analyzed for any gender-specific differences in clinical presentation and etiology of cerebral venous thrombosis. Results: There were 15 females while 11 males with a female:male ratio of 1.4:1. The mean age was 29.4± standard deviation 8.9 with the age range of 15–49. Headache was the most common and usually the first presenting symptoms present in 65% followed by hemiparesis and cranial nerve palsies. The first neurological examination was normal in 9/26 (34.6%) of the patients, while the common abnormality was cranial nerve palsies. Infections and trauma played an important part in risk factor analysis of our patient after the pregnancy- and hormone-related conditions. Some significant differences between the clinical presentation and risk factors among males and females were noted as age at presentation was higher in females while trauma and infections were common in male patients, although the involvement of the sinuses and response to treatment did not prove to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The results of this study were similar to the available literature with few differences. The relatively higher proportion of males in our study can be explained partly with more cases of traumatic CVST. Some important differences were noted between the risk factors and clinical presentation among genders. Large-scale prospective studies are needed to further clarify these differences.


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