Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 101-106

Corpus callosum and neglect syndrome: Clinical findings after meningioma removal and anatomical review


1 Department of Anatomy, Lisbon Medical School, Lisboa, Portugal
2 Department of Anatomy, Lisbon Medical School; Department of Neurosurgical, Hospital Santa Maria, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, Lisboa, Portugal
3 Department of Anatomy, Lisbon Medical School; Department of Neurosurgical, Hospital Santa Maria, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, Lisboa, Portugal; Department of Paediatric and Adult Neurosurgery, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London

Correspondence Address:
José Pedro Lavrador
Rua Cidade de Faro Nș 40 2725-689 Mem-Martins, Lisboa

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-3147.193549

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Two types of neglect are described: hemispatial and motivational neglect syndromes. Neglect syndrome is a neurophysiologic condition characterized by a malfunction in one hemisphere of the brain, resulting in contralateral hemispatial neglect in the absence of sensory loss and the right parietal lobe lesion being the most common anatomical site leading to it. In motivational neglect, the less emotional input is considered from the neglected side where anterior cingulate cortex harbors the most frequent lesions. Nevertheless, there are reports of injuries in the corpus callosum (CC) causing hemispatial neglect syndrome, particularly located in the splenium. It is essential for a neurosurgeon to recognize this clinical syndrome as it can be either a primary manifestation of neurosurgical pathology (tumor, vascular lesion) or as a postoperative iatrogenic clinical finding. The authors report a postoperative hemispatial neglect syndrome after a falcotentorial meningioma removal that recovered 10 months after surgery and performs a clinical, anatomical, and histological review centered in CC as key agent in neglect syndrome.


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