Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 392-394

Craniopharyngioma causing bilateral vision loss 4 months after unremarkable magnetic resonance imaging of the brain


1 Department of Ophthalmology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA
2 Department of Ophthalmology; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA

Correspondence Address:
Curtis E Margo
Department of Ophthalmology, University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs. Blvd., MDC Box 21, Tampa, FL 33612
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-3147.158770

Rights and Permissions

A 65-year-old man developed bilateral vision loss 4 months after magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no lesion in the vicinity of the optic chiasm, hypothalamus, and suprasellar tissues. Repeat computed tomography 3 months later showed a predominantly cystic mass of the suprasellar cistern with extension into the anterior third ventricle, which histologically was a craniopharyngioma. The clinical course of this case fuels the controversy whether craniopharyngiomas arise from embryonic rests or can be acquired. From a clinical perspective, it raises questions about when to obtain imaging studies dedicated to the chiasm and the appropriate interval in which a scan should be repeated to exclude structural causes of bilateral vision loss.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1569    
    Printed16    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded86    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal